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Old January 10th, 2015   #1
ibike2havefun
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Default Before I start cutting holes in the plastic...

... I'd like to get confirmation, denial, correction, guidance, and accumulated wisdom and knowledge from those who have gone before me.

Before I get to the questions, I need to explain what I'm trying to do and what's been accomplished so far.

Inspired by Mick's "Farkling Rampage" thread, I decided I too wanted to have some electrical connections available at the front end of the bike. These would comprise a couple of power sockets, power for auxiliary lights, and power for heated grips if ever I decide I want them. Also, power for a pair of sockets that mount on the left side of the bike just behind the suspension pre-load adjuster knob.

I started in by installing a relay, ground strip, and fuse block in the aft end of the bike, just like Mick. I've run wires from the fuse block, through routes dark and devious, getting them to end in various strategic locations at the front of and along the sides of the bike.

All of the wiring so far has run along the left side of the bike, because I simply could not find a route past the frame member, around the moisture barrier, under the fuel tank, and back to daylight on the right side. Not counting the wires that will supply power to the dual-socket plate that I installed just behind the rear suspension preload adjuster, I've installed three runs to the vicinity of the front.

One set ends about at the front of (but above) the engine on the left side, with the intent of supplying power to a socket mounted somewhere on the left side of the middle cowling. Another set continues past the engine, behind the forks, past the steering tube, and heads back aft, ending about at the back of the engine so as to have plenty of length to accommodate placement of a socket on the right side middle cowling.

The third set extends past the engine and is currently just dangling in the vicinity of the front axle; this is the one that would eventually power auxiliary lights once I choose and acquire them.

The next step is to decide exactly where I will mount the two power sockets, and this is where I find myself needing your guidance, gentle readers. One is a standard Powerlet socket, requiring a hole 11/16 inch in diameter and 2 inches of free space behind the panel. The other is the Powerlet cigarette lighter style of socket, which takes a hole 1.125" in diameter and needs 1.75 inch of free space behind the panel.

I had originally planned to locate the sockets in the "free" space just below (i.e. to the back of) the fairing pocket covers. Problem is, it appears to me now as if those locations are exactly above the locations of the ignition coils and the coils look like they're too close to the cowl panel to allow the socket the free space that Powerlet says is needed.

So my questions are:
  1. Has anyone actually successfully put sockets in these spots? (I think Mick did but want confirmation.)
  2. It looks as if there is a great deal more free space either ahead of, to the insides of, or below the fairing pockets. Is putting the sockets somewhere inside the fairing pockets themselves a viable alternative? What else might I need to do in such a case?
  3. Specifically, if the sockets are mounted inside the fairing pockets, what's the implication in terms of device cable routing vis-a-vis actually being able to close the pocket covers? It doesn't look as though I'd be able to close them fully if I had a device plugged in. So, what to do about that?
  4. Is there some other spot I should consider? E.g. perhaps the colored part of the cowling lower down such as near the inspection panels?

Thanks!
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Old January 10th, 2015   #2
AlleyBrewer
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Default Re: Before I start cutting holes in the plastic...

I just installed a marine cigarette lighter style outlet inside the left pocket getting power from a quartet. I tested closing the lid over the pretty thick cord and the lid easily flexes enough to latch closed with the cable in place. In fact, the little bit of pinch helps control the wire when I have the Garmin mounted. You can test this for yourself before cutting anything and see if it works for you, too. I wanted the outlet inside the left pocket and the best way I could come up with was on the front of the pocket, nowhere else seemed to have enough outside space.
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Old January 10th, 2015   #3
chaissos
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Default Re: Before I start cutting holes in the plastic...

I installed a regular socket (cigarette lighter style) in the right pocket, at the front of the space. I also used a dual cable, skeyed connector (radio shack) so that I can simply disconnect the socket when I want to remove the fairing side panel.

For the powerlet, I used the one included with my bar risers.

Both outlets are run from the quartet harness, with the powerlet being switched, and the cigarette lighter outlet being hot all the time (eg, with key off). I use the second one to plug my battery tender into when the bike is parked - I don't need anything powered when the bike is off, but it works both ways.

Using the quartet harness is handy for me, since all the circuits are fused.

I used another constant power circuit from the quartet harness to power my GPS. I routinely take it off the bike when I park it, so there's no worry of it running the battery down, but it also keeps the GPS running when I stop for short periods of time - like fueling.

There are likely a dozen scenarios where different config's would work, but this is what works for me.

Good luck.
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Old January 11th, 2015   #4
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Default Re: Before I start cutting holes in the plastic...

@ Chaissos -> Thanks. Pocket installation seems like it is dual-edged: (+) socket is out of sight and out of the weather (mostly) so connections are more protected (-) To connect it's necessary to have the device cable somehow pass through the walls of the pocket or between the lip of the pocket and the edge of the cover.

@ AlleyBrewer -> Seems that your experience trumps the (-) at least for the left side. Any issues with water getting in there when operating with a device connected during wet weather? Or has than scenario not happened to you?

FWIW I also got feedback on "the other" ST forum including a link to a VERY detailed and thorough post on exactly this topic. It included photos and measurements to within 0.001", demonstrating absolutely beyond doubt that my original plan (swiped from Mick) is viable. Time to fire up the drill...
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Old January 11th, 2015   #5
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Default Re: Before I start cutting holes in the plastic...

Quote:
Originally Posted by ibike2havefun View Post
So my questions are:
  1. Has anyone actually successfully put sockets in these spots? (I think Mick did but want confirmation.)
  2. It looks as if there is a great deal more free space either ahead of, to the insides of, or below the fairing pockets. Is putting the sockets somewhere inside the fairing pockets themselves a viable alternative? What else might I need to do in such a case?
  3. Specifically, if the sockets are mounted inside the fairing pockets, what's the implication in terms of device cable routing vis-a-vis actually being able to close the pocket covers? It doesn't look as though I'd be able to close them fully if I had a device plugged in. So, what to do about that?
  4. Is there some other spot I should consider? E.g. perhaps the colored part of the cowling lower down such as near the inspection panels?
Keith, to answer your 1st question, yes I did mount powerlet sockets just to the rear of both pockets on both sides. Below is a set of detailed pics that will show you how I routed my wiring.

Concerning the right side wiring, I unfortunately I did not take a picture while the tank was raised but what I did was follow the right side wiring harness with my farkle leads. Hopefully these pictures will answer your questions.

As to mounting sockets in the pocket, that would create a problem when you went to remove your fairings for maintenance. On my ST1100 I had my fuse block mounted inside the right lock pocket and every time I had to remove that fairing, I had to disconnect all the wires from the fuse block before I was able to get the fairing off. It was a PITA.





Right Side:













Left Side:






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Last edited by Mick; January 11th, 2015 at 12:57 PM.
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Old January 11th, 2015   #6
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Default Re: Before I start cutting holes in the plastic...

Disconnecting the fairing is easy, if you use some sort of connector. I don't have the part number I bought at Radio Shack, but it's similar to this one at Amazon:

http://www.amazon.com/Waterproof-Ele.../dp/B00BSOV36W
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Old January 11th, 2015   #7
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Default Re: Before I start cutting holes in the plastic...

Quote:
Originally Posted by chaissos View Post
Disconnecting the fairing is easy, if you use some sort of connector. I don't have the part number I bought at Radio Shack, but it's similar to this one at Amazon:

http://www.amazon.com/Waterproof-Ele.../dp/B00BSOV36W

Here's the setup I had on my ST1100 (full post HERE):





They were mostly spade connectors but the main positive lead was bolted on. Also notice that the hole through which the wires entered the pocket had a white, clay like material to keep water out. Like I said, undoing all this to allow the fairing to be removed was a PITA.
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Last edited by Mick; January 11th, 2015 at 10:01 AM.
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Old January 11th, 2015   #8
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Default Re: Before I start cutting holes in the plastic...

HI Keith. No experience on how having a wire passing through the lid will do in the rain, I'm a fair weather rider. When I installed the quartet, I also bought several pairs of those style of multi-pin connectors so I used those for the wires to the power outlet so I can reach through the nose and plug and unplug those before dremoving the tupperware. I and also used those for the little volt meter I added to the right side of the dash, routing right side wires exactly as Mick did in those great photos. The fairings fit tightly and I did have a hassle finding ways to arrange the quartet and other wires on the left side so the fairing didn't touch them. Good luck!
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Old January 11th, 2015   #9
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Default Re: Before I start cutting holes in the plastic...

Ah, so you put the fuseblock in the pocket. I only have a power socket there.

Still, you could use a multi-wire connector. They do make them. Even in a water-proof configuration.
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Old January 13th, 2015   #10
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Default Re: Before I start cutting holes in the plastic...

I'm simple and don't require (so far, only been 150,000 miles) more than one 15 amp Marinco power point which I mounted inside the right hand fairing pocket thru the vertical front side of the pocket. We used to call these cigarette lighters. I didn't want it out in the weather but the Marinco one is locking and weatherproof. I use the right side because the left one holds my coffee or water thermos bottle.

I routed the 14 gauge duplex cable from the battery, fused inches from the battery, between the air box and frame on the right side. I included enough cable so when I prepare to remove the middle cowl with the pocket I can unscrew the threaded ring that secures the power point and push the unit clear into the pocket to disconnect the pos and neg spade terminals. I do this after removing the inner cowl next to the radiator and can reach up from the bottom to unscrew the threaded ring. With the power point completely inside the fairing pocket I disconnect the wires to it and the middle cowl can be removed easypeasy. From the backside of the positive terminal I jumped a power supply wire to a relay for the dual Fiamm horns.

This has been adequate to charge cell phones and iPods as necessary long rides or on trips. I leave the phone or player charging in the pocket while riding and despite dire warnings about overheating electronic devices I've not encountered a problem yet.

I took the Marinco male fitting for the power point and grafted it onto my motorcycle battery charger. I plug in the charger or a tender thru the fairing pocket power point.

The heated grips have their own dedicated switched power cable running from the ACC fuse location in the fuse box. The 3 position switch is also inside the RH fairing pocket above the power point inlet. The cable also runs along the same route as the accessory power point.

The GPS uses a dedicated Garmin cable from the battery to a point next to the handlebar top clamp. It's unswitched power - I sometimes need to use the GPS on the bike in a campground or hotel parking lot and desired unswitched power. Only once have I left it on in the garage at home and yes it did run the battery down in a week.
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Last edited by dduelin; January 13th, 2015 at 01:09 PM.
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